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Welcome toWyoming Association of Rural Water Systems

Quick Links

  • Programs
  • NRWA
  • Funders
  • USEPA Region 8
  • SCHOLARSHIP

Fleet Program - The National Rural Water Association has created partnerships with the Ford Motor Company and the Chrysler Group  to offer special fleet discounts to State Rural Water Associations and their utility system members.

Quality On Tap! - “Quality On Tap – Our Commitment, Our Profession” is a nationwide, grassroots public relations and awareness campaign designed especially for the drinking water industry.

Water University - Ready to renew your UMC certification? 

Rural Water Loan Fund - The RWLF provides low-cost loans for short-term repair costs, small capital projects, or pre-development costs associated with larger projects.

WARWS is a member of the National Rural Water Association (NRWA).

The National Rural Water Association is a non-profit organization dedicated to training, supporting, and promoting the water and wastewater professionals that serve small communities across the United States.  The mission of NRWA is to strengthen State Associations.

Learn more about WARWS & NRWA initiatives by visiting the NRWA web site.

NRWA Web Site

United States Department of Agriculture Rural Development
Lorraine Werner | Community Programs Director
U.S. Department of Agriculture
PO Box 11005 | Casper, WY 82602-5006
Phone: 307-532-4880
Lorraine.werner@wy.usda.gov
website: www.rurdev.usda.gov

Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality
Bill Tillman
State Revolving Fund Principal Engineer
Wyoming Water Quality Division
122 West 25th Street #4W, Cheyenne WY 82002
Ph. 307-777-6941 
william.tillman@wyo.gov
website: http://deq.state.wy.us/wqd/www/srf/index.asp

Wyoming State Land Investment Board (Slib)
Beth Blackwell
Grants & Loans Manager
State of Wyoming
Office of State Lands & Investments
122 West 25th Street #3W, Cheyenne WY 82002
phone: 307-777-6373
website: http://lands.state.wy.us/

Wyoming Water Development Commission
Harry LaBonde, Director
Harry.labonde@wyo.gov
6920 Yellowtail Road, Cheyenne, Wyoming 82002
Telephone: (307) 777-7626
Fax: (307) 777-6819
website: http://wwdc.state.wy.us/

UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY REGION 8

1595 Wynkoop Street DENVER, CO 80202-1129
Phone 1-(800) 227-8917


https://www.epa.gov/region8-waterops

Download Contact Sheet

The Wyoming Rural Water Foundation is a 501 (c)(3) organization dedicated to providing scholarships to Wyoming eligible high school seniors and also supports the technical assistance programs of the Wyoming Association of Rural Water Systems.  It is the hope of the Foundation that eligible seniors will take advantage of this scholarship opportunity and also will consider studies in the water/wastewater and or environmental sciences.  The mission statement of the Association is to provide the assistance necessary to meet the needs of our membership and to ensure the protection of Wyoming’s water ~ our most precious resource.

The water utility profession is an economically stable, in demand and demanding lifetime opportunity!  Good luck and thank you for your scholarship application.

Download Application


Mark Pepper, Executive Director
Wyoming Association of Rural Water Systems

PO Box 1750
Glenrock, WY 82637
307-436-8636 office
307-259-6903 cell

Latest WARWS News

Access to clean water still isn’t universal

BY LAUREL HAMERS

NOVEMBER 25, 2018

DRINKABILITY Researchers are testing new ways to bring affordable water treatment to smaller towns and to people who rely on wells.

Off a gravel road at the edge of a college campus — next door to the town’s holding pen for stray dogs — is a busy test site for the newest technologies in drinking water treatment.

In the large shed-turned-laboratory, University of Massachusetts Amherst engineer David Reckhow has started a movement. More people want to use his lab to test new water treatment technologies than the building has space for.

The lab is a revitalization success story. In the 1970s, when the Clean Water Act put new restrictions on water pollution, the diminutive grey building in Amherst, Mass. was a place to test those pollution-control measures. But funding was fickle, and over the years, the building fell into disrepair. In 2015, Reckhow brought the site back to life. He and a team of researchers cleaned out the junk, whacked the weeds that engulfed the building and installed hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of monitoring equipment, much of it donated or bought secondhand.

“We recognized that there's a lot of need for drinking water technology,” Reckhow says. Researchers, students and start-up companies all want access to test ways to disinfect drinking water, filter out contaminants or detect water-quality slipups. On a Monday afternoon in October, the lab is busy. Students crunch data around a big table in the main room. Small-scale tests of technology that uses electrochemistry to clean water chug along, hooked up to monitors that track water quality. On a lab bench sits a graduate student’s low-cost replica of an expensive piece of monitoring equipment. The device alerts water treatment plants when the by-products of disinfection chemicals in a water supply are reaching dangerous levels. In an attached garage, two startup companies are running larger-scale tests of new kinds of membranes that filter out contaminants.

BACK TO LIFE technology.

DAVID RECKHOW

Parked behind the shed is the almost-ready-to-roll newcomer. Starting in 2019, the Mobile Water Innovation Laboratory will take promising new and affordable technologies to local communities for testing. That’s important, says Reckhow, because there’s so much variety in the quality of water that comes into drinking water treatment plants. On-site testing is the only way to know whether a new approach is effective, he says, especially for newer technologies without long-term track records.

The facility’s popularity reflects a persistent concern in the United States: how to ensure affordable access to clean, safe drinking water. Although U.S. drinking water is heavily regulated and pretty clean overall, recent high-profile contamination cases, such as the 2014 lead crisis in Flint, Mich. (SN: 3/19/16, p. 8), have exposed weaknesses in the system and shaken people’s trust in their tap water.

Tapped out

In 2013 and 2014, 42 drinking water–associated outbreaks resulted in more than 1,000 illnesses and 13 deaths, based on reports to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The top culprits were Legionella bacteria and some form of chemical, toxin or parasite, according to data published in November 2017.

Those numbers tell only part of the story, however. Many of the contaminants that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulates through the 1974 Safe Drinking Water Act cause problems only when exposure happens over time; the effects of contaminants like lead don’t appear immediately after exposure. Records of EPA rule violations note that in 2015, 21 million people were served by drinking water systems that didn’t meet standards, researchers reported in a February study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. That report tracked trends in drinking water violations from 1982 to 2015.

New rules boost violations

The Safe Drinking Water Act regulates levels of contaminants in public water supplies. This graph tracks violations of the act over time. Spikes in violations often coincide with new, more stringent rules.

Water quality violations in U.S. water systems

  1. ALLAIRE, H. WU AND U. LALL/PNAS2018, ADAPTED BY E. OTWELL

Current technology can remove most contaminants, says David Sedlak, an environmental engineer at the University of California, Berkeley. Those include microbes, arsenic, nitrates and lead. “And then there are some that are very difficult to degrade or transform,” such as industrial chemicals called PFAS.

Smaller communities, especially, can’t always afford top-of-the-line equipment or infrastructure overhauls to, for example, replace lead pipes. So Reckhow’s facility is testing approaches to help communities address water-quality issues in affordable ways.

Some researchers are adding technologies to deal with new, potentially harmful contaminants. Others are designing approaches that work with existing water infrastructure or clean up contaminants at their source.

How is your water treated?

A typical drinking water treatment plant sends water through a series of steps.

First, coagulants are added to the water. These chemicals clump together sediments, which can cloud water or make it taste funny, so they are bigger and easier to remove. A gentle shaking or spinning of the water, called flocculation, helps those clumps form (1). Next, the water flows into big tanks to sit for a while so the sediments can fall to the bottom (2). The cleaner water then moves through membranes that filter out smaller contaminants (3). Disinfection, via chemicals or ultraviolet light, kills harmful bacteria and viruses (4). Then the water is ready for distribution (5).

  1. OTWELL

There’s a lot of room for variation within that basic water treatment process. Chemicals added at different stages can trigger reactions that break down chunky, toxic organic molecules into less harmful bits. Ion-exchange systems that separate contaminants by their electric charge can remove ions like magnesium or calcium that make water “hard,” as well as heavy metals, such as lead and arsenic, and nitrates from fertilizer runoff. Cities mix and match these strategies, adjusting chemicals and prioritizing treatment components, based on the precise chemical qualities of the local water supply.

Some water utilities are streamlining the treatment process by installing technologies like reverse osmosis, which removes nearly everything from the water by forcing the water molecules through a selectively permeable membrane with extremely tiny holes. Reverse osmosis can replace a number of steps in the water treatment process or reduce the number of chemicals added to water. But it’s expensive to install and operate, keeping it out of reach for many cities.

Fourteen percent of U.S. residents get water from wells and other private sources that aren’t regulated by the Safe Drinking Water Act. These people face the same contamination challenges as municipal water systems, but without the regulatory oversight, community support or funding.

“When it comes to lead in private wells … you’re on your own. Nobody is going to help you,” says Marc Edwards, the Virginia Tech engineer who helped uncover the Flint water crisis. Edwards and Virginia Tech colleague Kelsey Pieper collected water-quality data from over 2,000 wells across Virginia in 2012 and 2013. Some were fine, but others had lead levels of more than 100 parts per billion. When levels are higher than its 15 ppb threshold, the EPA mandates that cities take steps to control corrosion and notify the public about the contamination. The researchers reported those findings in 2015 in the Journal of Water and Health.

To remove lead and other contaminants, well users often rely on point-of-use treatments. A filter on the tap removes most, but not all, contaminants. Some people spring for costly reverse osmosis systems.

Our Mission

The mission of the Wyoming Association of Rural Water Systems is: To provide the assistance necessary to meet the needs of our membership and to ensure the protection of Wyoming's water - "Our Most Precious Resource".

By providing on-site, one-on-one technical assistance and training we can help the State's operators with their commitment and their profession of providing "Quality on Tap!".

Your Representatives

Visit your Congressional Delegation online.

Senator Mike Enzi
Senator John Barrasso
Representative Liz Cheney

The Wyoming Connection

wyoming connection

The Wyoming Connection is the official publication of WARWS; published quarterly for distribution to member systems, water & wastewater Operations, water related agencies & companies, legislators & government officials. This valuable industry publication is only available to WARWS members!

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Training Conferences

training conference

Learn more about WARWS Bi-Annual Training Conferences. Click the link below to learn more about attending, sponsoring, or expo booth rentals. 

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